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The I Ching for Android

There were "old" features in your gua (hexagram). It means that you have two hexagrams. The first one — is something that the Book tells you at the moment, the second is something it warns you about. Ascending (shēng). Pushing Upward Sojourning (lǚ). The Wanderer

hieroglyph Ascending (shēng). Pushing Upwardhexagram 46 Ascending (shēng). Pushing Upward

46. Ascending (shēng). Pushing Upward

Advise

When a person moves forward, the soul can not remain on its place. Let accumulation of treasures of the soul is outstripping the growth of material profit.

Inital text of I Ching

The Judgement

Pushing Upward has supreme success. One must see the great man. Fear not. Departure toward the south brings good fortune.

The Image

Within the earth, wood grows:
The image of Pushing Upward. Thus the superior man of devoted character heaps up small things in order to achieve something high and great.

  1. Pushing upward that meets with confidence brings great good fortune.
  2. If one is sincere, it furthers one to bring even a small offering. No blame.
  3. One pushes upward into an empty city.
  4. The king offers him Mount Ch'i. Good fortune. No blame.
  5. Perseverance brings good fortune. One pushes upward by steps.
  6. Pushing upward in darkness. It furthers one to be unremittingly persevering.

Prediction

It is time of development and progress. The direction is correct. Learn how to properly dispose of the results of your work, and do not regret the inevitable losses. All difficulties are temporary. Beware satiety. Pay more attention to spiritual growth.

Richard Wilhelm's commentary

The lower trigram, Sun, represents wood, and the upper, K'un, means the earth. Linked with this is the idea that wood in the earth grows upward. In contrast to the meaning of Chin, PROGRESS (35), this pushing upward is associated with effort, just as a plant needs energy for pushing upward through the earth. That is why this hexagram, although it is connected with success, is associated with effort of the will. In PROGRESS the emphasis is on expansion; PUSHING UPWARD indicates rather a vertical ascent-direct rise from obscurity and lowliness to power and influence.

THE JUDGMENT

The pushing upward of the good elements encounters no obstruction and is therefore accompanied by great success. The pushing upward is made possible not by violence but by modesty and adaptability. Since the individual is borne along by the propitiousness of the time, he advances. He must go to see authoritative people. He need not be afraid to do this, because success is assured. But he must set to work, for activity (this is the meaning of "the south") brings good fortune.

THE IMAGE

Adapting itself to obstacles and bending around them, wood in the earth grows upward without haste and without rest. Thus too the superior man is devoted in character and never pauses in his progress.

1

This situation at the beginning of ascent. Just as wood draws strength for its upward push from the root, which in itself is in the lowest place, so the power to rise comes from this low and obscure station. But there is a spiritual affinity with the rulers above, and this solidarity creates the confidence needed to accomplish something.

2

Here a strong man is presupposed. It is true that he does not fit in with his environment, inasmuch as he is too brusque and pays too little attention to form. But as he is upright in character, he meets with response, and his lack of outward form does no harm. Here uprightness is the outcome of sound qualities of character, whereas in the corresponding line of the preceding hexagram it is the result of innate humility.

3

All obstructions that generally block progress fall away here. Things proceed with remarkable ease. Unhesitatingly one follows this road, in order to profit by one's success. Seen from without, everything seems to be in the best of order. However, no promise of good fortune is added. It is a question how long such unobstructed success can last. But it is wise not to yield to such misgivings, because they only inhibit one's power. Instead, the point is to profit by the propitiousness of time.

4

Mount Ch'i is in the western China, the homeland of King Wên, whose son, the Duke of Chou, added the words to the individual lines. The pronouncement takes us back to a time when the Chou dynasty was coming into power. At that time King Wên introduced his illustrious helpers to the god of his native mountain, and they received their places in the halls of the ancestors by the side of the ruler. This indicates a stage in which pushing upward attains its goal. One acquires fame in the sight of gods and men, is received into the circle of those who foster the spiritual life of the nation, and thereby attains a significance that endures beyond time.

5

When a man is advancing farther and farther, it is important for him not to become intoxicated by success. Precisely when he experiences great success it is necessary to remain sober and not to try to skip any stages; he must go on slowly, step by step, as though hesitant. Only such calm, steady progress, overleaping nothing, leads to the goal.

6

He who pushes upward blindly deludes himself. He knows only advance, not retreat. But this means exhaustion. In such a case it is important to be constantly mindful that one must be conscientious and consistent and must remain so. Only thus does one become free of blind impulse, which is always harmful.

Barbara Hejslip interpretation

To what you so aspired also to that have given so many forces and energy, soon at last it will be executed, will give positive result. Remains very little, gather with forces and work it is a little more, as persistently and honesty, as before. Now to you is better to operate resolutely and safely, rather than to be hidden and passively to wait. Rely on intuition and common sense, and your desire then it will for certain be executed. Those ideas and ideas which now come to to you mind, most likely will bring to you success and in your financial affairs.



hieroglyph Sojourning (lǚ). The Wandererhexagram 56 Sojourning (lǚ). The Wanderer

56. Sojourning (lǚ). The Wanderer

Advise

Do not stay long in one place. Choose the right path and be firm in achieving the goal. Great way begins with small steps.

Inital text of I Ching

The Judgement

The Wanderer. Success through smallness. Perseverance brings good fortune to the wanderer.

The Image

Fire on the mountain:
The image of the Wanderer. Thus the superior man is clear-minded and cautious in imposing penalties, and protracts no lawsuits.

  1. If the wanderer busies himself with trivial things, he draws down misfortune upon himself.
  2. The wanderer comes to an inn. He has his property with him. He wins the steadfastness of a young servant.
  3. The wanderer's inn burns down. He loses the steadfastness of his young servant. Danger.
  4. The wanderer rests in a shelter. He obtains his property and an ax. My heart is not glad.
  5. He shoots a pheasant. It drops with the first arrow. In the end this brings both praise and office.
  6. The bird's nest burns up. The wanderer laughs at first, then must needs lament and weep. Through carelessness he loses his cow. Misfortune.

Prediction

There is a need to make a trip - literally or figuratively. This may be perhaps a distant and long trip but also can mean a trip to knowledge or a trip 'inward' (spiritual search). Anyway, you need to understand the purpose of traveling and prepare for it. You should start with small steps. Often the traveler suffers deprivation, feels like a stranger in a strange world – take it all takes fearlessly. Benefit of triple is beyond doubt. Award may be material (fame, profit, progress up the career ladder) or intangible (the acquisition of skills, knowledge, and spiritual growth).

Richard Wilhelm's commentary

The mountain, Kên, stands still; above it fire, Li, flames up and does not tarry. Therefore the two trigrams do not stay together. Strange lands and separation are the wanderer's lot.

THE JUDGMENT

When a man is a wanderer and stranger, he should not be gruff nor overbearing. He has no large circle of acquaintances, therefore he should not give himself airs. He must be cautious and reserved; in this way he protects himself from evil. If he is obliging toward others, he wins success.

A wanderer has no fixed abode; his home is the road. Therefore he must take care to remain upright and steadfast, so that he sojourns only in the proper places, associating only with good people. Then he has good fortune and can go his way unmolested.

THE IMAGE

When grass on a mountain takes fire, there is bright light. However, the fire does not linger in one place, but travels on to new fuel. It is a phenomenon of short duration. This is what penalties and lawsuits should be like. They should be a quickly passing matter, and must not be dragged out indefinitely. Prisons ought to be places where people are lodged only temporarily, as guests are. They must not become dwelling places.

1

A wanderer should not demean himself or busy himself with inferior things he meets with along the way. The humbler and more defenseless his outward position, the more should he preserve his inner dignity. For a stranger is mistaken if he hopes to find a friendly reception through lending himself to jokes and buffoonery. The result will be only contempt and insulting treatment.

2

The wanderer her described is modest and reserved. He does not lose touch with his inner being, hence he finds a resting place. In the outside world he does not lose the liking of other people, hence all persons further him, so that he can acquire property. Moreover, he wins the allegiance of a faithful and trustworthy servant-a thing of inestimable value to a wanderer.

3

A truculent stranger does not know how to behave properly. He meddles in affairs and controversies that do not concern him; thus he loses his resting place. He treats his servant with aloofness and arrogance; thus he loses the man's loyalty. When a stranger in a strange land has no one left on whom he can rely, the situation becomes very dangerous.

4

This describes a wanderer who knows how to limit his desires outwardly, though he is inwardly strong and aspiring. Therefore he finds at least a place of shelter in which he can stay. He also succeeds in acquiring property, but even with this he is not secure. He must be always on guard, ready to defend himself with arms. Hence he is not at ease. He is persistently conscious of being a stranger in a strange land.

5

Traveling statesman were in the habit of introducing themselves to local princes with the gift of a pheasant, killing it at the first shot. Thus he finds friends who praise and recommend him, and in the end the prince accepts him and confers an office upon him.

Circumstances often cause a man to seek a home in foreign parts. If he knows how to meet the situation and how to introduce himself in the right way, he may find a circle of friends and a sphere of activity even in a strange country.

6

The picture of a bird whose nest burns up indicates loss of one's resting place. This misfortune may overtake the bird if it is heedless and imprudent when building its nest. It is the same with a wanderer. If he lets himself go, laughing and jesting, and forgets that he is a wanderer, he will later have cause to weep and lament. For if through carelessness a man loses his cow- i.e., his modesty and adaptability-evil will result.

Barbara Hejslip interpretation

Whether you know, what now there is all preconditions for success in affairs? If you plan to go abroad also it take place successfully. You are too ambitious, therefore you need to behave very circumspectly to not spoil relations with friends and fellow workers. Let your claims will not be too high also your desire will be executed. You very much experience and nervous in occasion of there is nobody unpleasant event. It is not necessary to think of this; forget and do not recollect.