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There were "old" features in your gua (hexagram). It means that you have two hexagrams. The first one — is something that the Book tells you at the moment, the second is something it warns you about. Attending (xū). Waiting Sojourning (lǚ). The Wanderer

hieroglyph Attending (xū). Waitinghexagram 5 Attending (xū). Waiting

5. Attending (xū). Waiting

Advise

Keep calm being in involuntary failure. Try to see no inauspicious where there is no it.

Inital text of I Ching

The Judgement

Waiting. If you are sincere, you have light and success. Perseverance brings good fortune. It furthers one to cross the great water.

The Image

Clouds rise up to heaven:
The image of Waiting. Thus the superior man eats and drinks, is joyous and of good cheer.

  1. Waiting in the meadow. It furthers one to abide in what endures. No blame.
  2. Waiting on the sand. There is some gossip. The end brings good fortune.
  3. Waiting in the mud brings about the arrival of the enemy.
  4. Waiting in blood. Get out of the pit.
  5. Waiting at meat and drink. Perseverance brings good fortune.
  6. One falls into the pit. Three uninvited guests arrive. Honor them, and in the end there will be good fortune.

Prediction

Show trust to the situation. Any event should ripen. Preparatory self-control and patience are needed. There are no trifles in life. Listen to news – quite unexpectedly dropped word can help solve the problem. Do not get bored, be who you are, no rash actions, do not act haphazardly. Be attentive to unexpected guests – they are not accidental. Know how to relax, enjoy your life, have good time, enjoy good food and beverages, but be moderate. You will soon get the desired, the situation will be harmonious.

Richard Wilhelm's commentary

All beings have need of nourishment from above. But the gift of food comes in its own time, and for this one must wait. This hexagram shows the clouds in the heavens, giving rain to refresh all that grows and to provide mankind with food and drink. The rain will come in its own time. We cannot make it come; we have to wait for it. The idea of waiting is further suggested by the attributes of the two trigrams--strength within, danger in from. Strength in the face of danger does not plunge ahead but bides its time, whereas weakness in the face of danger grows agitated and has not the patience to wait.

THE JUDGMENT

Waiting is not mere empty hoping. It has the inner certainty of reaching the goal. Such certainty alone gives that light which leads to success. This leads to the perseverance that brings good fortune and bestows power to cross the great water. One is faced with a danger that has to be overcome. Weakness and impatience can do nothing. Only a strong man can stand up to his fate, for his inner security enables him to endure to the end. This strength shows itself in uncompromising truthfulness [with himself]. It is only when we have the courage to face things exactly as they are, without any sort of self- deception or illusion, that a light will develop out of events, by which the path to success may be recognized. This recognition must be followed by resolute and persevering action. For only the man who goes to meet his fate resolutely is equipped to deal with it adequately. Then he will be able to cross the great water--that is to say, he will be capable of making the necessary decision and of surmounting the danger.

THE IMAGE

When clouds rise in the sky, it is a sign that it will rain. There is nothing to do but to wait until after the rain falls. It is the same in life when destiny is at work. We should not worry and seek to shape the future by interfering in things before the time is ripe. We should quietly fortify the body with food and drink and the mind with gladness and good cheer. Fate comes when it will, and thus we are ready.

1

The danger is not yet close. One is still waiting on the open plain. Conditions are still simple, yet there is a feeling of something impending. One must continue to lead a regular life as long as possible. Only in this way does one guard against a premature waste of strength, keep free of blame and error that would become a source of weakness later on.

2

The danger gradually comes closer. Sand is near the bank of the river, and the water means danger. Disagreements crop up. General unrest can easily develop in such times, and we lay the blame on one another. He who stays calm will succeed in making things go well in the end. Slander will be silenced if we do not gratify it with injured retorts.

3

Mud is no place for waiting, since it is already being washed by the water of the stream. Instead of having gathered strength to cross the stream at one try, one has made a premature start that has got him no farther than the muddy bank. Such an unfavorable position invites enemies from without, who naturally take advantage of it. Caution and a sense of the seriousness of the situation are all that can keep one from injury.

4

The situation is extremely dangerous. IT is of utmost gravity now--a matter of life and death. Bloodshed seems imminent. There is no going forward or backward; we are cut off as if in a pit. Now we must simply stand fast and let fate take its course. This composure, which keeps us from aggravating the trouble by anything we might do, is the only way of getting out of the dangerous pit.

5

Even in the midst of danger there come intervals of peace when things go relatively well. If we possess enough inner strength, we shall take advantage of these intervals to fortify ourselves for renewed struggle. We must know how to enjoy the moment without being deflected from the goal, for perseverance is needed to remain victorious.

This is true in public life as well; it is not possible to achieve everything all at once. The height of wisdom is to allow people enough recreation to quicken pleasure in their work until the task is completed. Herein lies the secret of the whole hexagram. It differs from Chin OBSTRUCTION (39), in the fact that in this instance, while waiting, we are sure of our cause and therefore do not lose the serenity born of inner cheerfulness.

6

The waiting is over; the danger can no longer be averted. One falls into the pit and must yield to the inevitable. Everything seems to have been in vain. But precisely in this extremity things take an unforeseen turn. Without a move on one's own part, there is outside intervention. At first one cannot be sure of its meaning: is it rescue or is it destruction? A person in this situation must keep his mind alert and not withdraw into himself with a sulky gesture of refusal, but must greet the new turn with respect. Thus he ultimately escapes the danger, and all goes well. Even happy turns of fortune often come in a form that at first seems strange to us.

Barbara Hejslip interpretation

Now time to wait and gather with forces, they will soon be necessary for you, and is very fast-when there will come spring, the snow will thaw, and flowers again will blossom. Haste and impatience in acts now can harm only. It is necessary to suffer still a little, month two, a certain person who will assist you yet is not how you and do not wait. And if you resolutely and vigorously will occupy in planning of the further actions the help and support will come even more quickly. You can feel an inclination to the person who is more senior than you. Try to find out the interest to him not too. If you will purposefully operate and circumspectly enough, your desire will be executed.



hieroglyph Sojourning (lǚ). The Wandererhexagram 56 Sojourning (lǚ). The Wanderer

56. Sojourning (lǚ). The Wanderer

Advise

Do not stay long in one place. Choose the right path and be firm in achieving the goal. Great way begins with small steps.

Inital text of I Ching

The Judgement

The Wanderer. Success through smallness. Perseverance brings good fortune to the wanderer.

The Image

Fire on the mountain:
The image of the Wanderer. Thus the superior man is clear-minded and cautious in imposing penalties, and protracts no lawsuits.

  1. If the wanderer busies himself with trivial things, he draws down misfortune upon himself.
  2. The wanderer comes to an inn. He has his property with him. He wins the steadfastness of a young servant.
  3. The wanderer's inn burns down. He loses the steadfastness of his young servant. Danger.
  4. The wanderer rests in a shelter. He obtains his property and an ax. My heart is not glad.
  5. He shoots a pheasant. It drops with the first arrow. In the end this brings both praise and office.
  6. The bird's nest burns up. The wanderer laughs at first, then must needs lament and weep. Through carelessness he loses his cow. Misfortune.

Prediction

There is a need to make a trip - literally or figuratively. This may be perhaps a distant and long trip but also can mean a trip to knowledge or a trip 'inward' (spiritual search). Anyway, you need to understand the purpose of traveling and prepare for it. You should start with small steps. Often the traveler suffers deprivation, feels like a stranger in a strange world – take it all takes fearlessly. Benefit of triple is beyond doubt. Award may be material (fame, profit, progress up the career ladder) or intangible (the acquisition of skills, knowledge, and spiritual growth).

Richard Wilhelm's commentary

The mountain, Kên, stands still; above it fire, Li, flames up and does not tarry. Therefore the two trigrams do not stay together. Strange lands and separation are the wanderer's lot.

THE JUDGMENT

When a man is a wanderer and stranger, he should not be gruff nor overbearing. He has no large circle of acquaintances, therefore he should not give himself airs. He must be cautious and reserved; in this way he protects himself from evil. If he is obliging toward others, he wins success.

A wanderer has no fixed abode; his home is the road. Therefore he must take care to remain upright and steadfast, so that he sojourns only in the proper places, associating only with good people. Then he has good fortune and can go his way unmolested.

THE IMAGE

When grass on a mountain takes fire, there is bright light. However, the fire does not linger in one place, but travels on to new fuel. It is a phenomenon of short duration. This is what penalties and lawsuits should be like. They should be a quickly passing matter, and must not be dragged out indefinitely. Prisons ought to be places where people are lodged only temporarily, as guests are. They must not become dwelling places.

1

A wanderer should not demean himself or busy himself with inferior things he meets with along the way. The humbler and more defenseless his outward position, the more should he preserve his inner dignity. For a stranger is mistaken if he hopes to find a friendly reception through lending himself to jokes and buffoonery. The result will be only contempt and insulting treatment.

2

The wanderer her described is modest and reserved. He does not lose touch with his inner being, hence he finds a resting place. In the outside world he does not lose the liking of other people, hence all persons further him, so that he can acquire property. Moreover, he wins the allegiance of a faithful and trustworthy servant-a thing of inestimable value to a wanderer.

3

A truculent stranger does not know how to behave properly. He meddles in affairs and controversies that do not concern him; thus he loses his resting place. He treats his servant with aloofness and arrogance; thus he loses the man's loyalty. When a stranger in a strange land has no one left on whom he can rely, the situation becomes very dangerous.

4

This describes a wanderer who knows how to limit his desires outwardly, though he is inwardly strong and aspiring. Therefore he finds at least a place of shelter in which he can stay. He also succeeds in acquiring property, but even with this he is not secure. He must be always on guard, ready to defend himself with arms. Hence he is not at ease. He is persistently conscious of being a stranger in a strange land.

5

Traveling statesman were in the habit of introducing themselves to local princes with the gift of a pheasant, killing it at the first shot. Thus he finds friends who praise and recommend him, and in the end the prince accepts him and confers an office upon him.

Circumstances often cause a man to seek a home in foreign parts. If he knows how to meet the situation and how to introduce himself in the right way, he may find a circle of friends and a sphere of activity even in a strange country.

6

The picture of a bird whose nest burns up indicates loss of one's resting place. This misfortune may overtake the bird if it is heedless and imprudent when building its nest. It is the same with a wanderer. If he lets himself go, laughing and jesting, and forgets that he is a wanderer, he will later have cause to weep and lament. For if through carelessness a man loses his cow- i.e., his modesty and adaptability-evil will result.

Barbara Hejslip interpretation

Whether you know, what now there is all preconditions for success in affairs? If you plan to go abroad also it take place successfully. You are too ambitious, therefore you need to behave very circumspectly to not spoil relations with friends and fellow workers. Let your claims will not be too high also your desire will be executed. You very much experience and nervous in occasion of there is nobody unpleasant event. It is not necessary to think of this; forget and do not recollect.